COVID-19 Update: Lagos Leads As NCDC Records 144 New Cases

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Lagos is leading other states of the federation in the latest COVID-19 cases,  according to the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC).

On its official website, yesterday, the NCDC stated that out of the 144 new infections, Lagos state  reported 101 cases, while Abia confirmed 13 additional cases.

The body also gave the figure of new cases for Akwa-Ibom as 10 while the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) reported nine, Kano State recorded three, while other states contributed the remaining figure.

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Kaduna State logged three cases, Bauchi reported one, Ekiti and Plateau states confirmed one case respectively.

The NCDC added that six states – Ogun, Ondo, Osun, Oyo, Rivers and Sokoto recorded zero cases.

The agency said that the latest cases had increased the country’s infection toll to 262,664, while the fatality toll stood at 3,147.

The NCDC website, in its breakdown of the latest infections, NCDC noted the surge in Lagos with a huge gap between it and other states.

Of the 262,664 total cases recorded since the outbreak of the pandemic in Feb. 2020, Lagos state confirmed 102,849 infections followed by the FCT and  Rivers with 29,070 and 17,656, respectively.

No fewer than 3,917 people are down with the virus, while 256,334 people had been treated and discharged nationwide since the outbreak of the virus  more than two years ago.

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